All posts by Herman

Isaiah 25:7,8


“And he will destroy in this mountain the face of the covering cast over all people, and the vail that is spread over all nations. He will swallow up death in victory; and the Lord GOD will wipe away tears from off all faces; and the rebuke of his people shall he take away from off all the earth: for the LORD hath spoken it.”

Students of the Bible will find these words familiar. They remind of ones found in the books of 1 Corinthians and in the Revelation. Like many prophecies in the Old Testament, these words have been fulfilled, and are yet to come.

The first promise is the destruction of the covering cast over all the people, the vail spread over all nations. Both phrases describe the same thing. In the tabernacle, a vail was hung before the Holy of Holies, in which was placed the ark of the covenant. Nobody except the high priest was allowed to go into the Holy of Holies. Only once a year was he allowed to go in. The book of Hebrews says that this showed that the way into the presence of God was not yet revealed (Hebrews 9:8).

When the LORD Jesus Christ died on the cross, He shouted, “It is Finished!” and the vail in front of the Holy of Holies was torn in two, from the top to the bottom. Upon Jesus’ death that vail was torn from above. Thus, the way into the Holy of Holies, God’s presence, was now made available. This all happened because of the sacrifice of the LORD Jesus Christ. This is the first fulfillment of this promise in Isaiah 25.

Philippians 2 teaches that the day is coming when all nations will see Jesus for Who He is. The hidden things of God will be revealed, and every knee shall bow and every tongue will confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of the Father. In that day the vail concerning Who Jesus is will be removed from before all nations; all will acknowledge Him as Lord. This is the future fulfillment of this promise in Isaiah 25.

Next, we read in Isaiah 25 that He will swallow up death in victory. This, too, has a dual fulfillment. Through the sacrifice of the LORD Jesus Christ, death has been defeated. Our sin, which held us in eternal death, was forgiven. Those who have the LORD Jesus Christ as their Savior are assured of eternal life. Those who don’t are assured of eternal death. Eternal death has been swallowed up in victory for those that have received eternal life.

Certainly, physical death has not stopped. But, a day is coming when the specter of physical death will also be swallowed up in victory. A glimpse of that is seen in the resurrection of the LORD Jesus Christ. His death was surely swallowed up in the victory of resurrection. He is called the firstfruits of them that are resurrected. This means that His resurrection is not the only one. Neither will it be the last! His was simply the first.

The third promise in Isaiah 25 is that God Himself will wipe away tears from off all faces. For those that have the LORD Jesus Christ as their Savior this is true in many ways. God’s presence and comfort are promised to us in the trials of life. God is called faithful. He goes through all of our trials with us.

But one day, in God’s eternal presence, tears will be wiped away, and nothing will be left except eternal joy, as promised in the book of Revelation. While tears are still shed on this earth for now, at the coming of the LORD Jesus Christ a new government will be established with Jesus as head. Then, there will be a new heaven and new earth. Old things will be passed away including tears and pain and sorrow (Revelation 21:4).

The last promise in Isaiah 25 is that He will take away the rebuke of His people from off all the earth. Sin is a rebuke to all people. When the LORD Jesus Christ came, the curse of sin was taken away in His sacrifice on the cross. The wrath of God due to all mankind for their sinful nature, and the resultant sin, was poured out on Jesus. Those who know Jesus as Savior are no longer under God’s rebuke.

Meanwhile, those who are God’s people endure the rebuke of the world, which rejects Jesus and God. God’s people suffer for their faith in God in many ways, even cruelly, at the hands of those that reject Him. But, the day is coming when that rebuke will be done away, too. He promises that He will take it away from off the whole earth. In that day, all of God’s children will be seen for who they are, and God will be glorified!

Finally, Isaiah 25 says that the LORD has spoken these things. His Word is sure. The Bible says that it is impossible for Him to lie. The things described in Isaiah 25:7, 8 have and will come to pass because they are God’s Word. He will perform what He promised, as noted in the beginning of verse 7. For those that are God’s these verses are a great assurance. For those that aren’t, here is a great warning, to be ignored at great peril. Either way, these promises have come to pass, and will come to pass. God has promised.

Standing on the promises of Christ my king,
Through eternal ages let His praises ring,
Glory in the highest, I will shout and sing,
Standing on the promises of God.

Refrain

Standing, standing,
Standing on the promises of God my Savior;
Standing, standing,
I’m standing on the promises of God.

Standing on the promises that cannot fail,
When the howling storms of doubt and fear assail,
By the living Word of God I shall prevail,
Standing on the promises of God.

Refrain (R. Kelso Carter)

Hebrews 10:32, 33

“But call to remembrance the former days, in which, after ye were illuminated, ye endured a great fight of afflictions; partly, whilst ye were made a gazingstock both by reproaches and afflictions; and partly, whilst ye became companions of them that were so used.”

     We are encouraged in many scriptures to remember things. We are to remember the LORD and His afflictions, death, burial, and resurrection when we worship, “This do in remembrance of me.” Through his second epistle, Peter writes to help his readers to keep certain things in remembrance. Remembering God, Who He is, and what He has done is vital.

     The author of Hebrews tells his readers to call to remembrance their afflictions. This is not what we want to remember. We would rather forget them. In context, the writer wants them to recall where they had been in their lives. He was concerned that they were in danger of leaving their faith, and returning to previous beliefs. He tells them in verse 35, “Cast not away therefore your confidence, which hath great recompence of reward.” They were in a position of confidence before God, and he didn’t want them to leave it behind. So, he told them to remember what they had endured when they first trusted in Christ.

     The author speaks of enduring a great fight of afflictions. This is more than snide remarks, but includes the full range of things Christians endure, including ridicule, shunning, torture, and even death. His readers had not yet endured death. But, they had endured a great fight of many other afflictions. The writer tells them that the reason they endured such things was because they were illuminated, or made to see. Using the same word, Paul told the Ephesians 1:18-20, “The eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints, and what is the exceeding greatness of his power to us-ward who believe, according to the working of his mighty power, which he wrought in Christ, when he raised him from the dead, and set him at his own right hand in the heavenly places…” Their illumination was in the things of God through Christ. And because of this they “…were made a gazingstock both by reproaches and afflictions…” and they “… became companions of them that were so used.”

     The term gazingstock has the idea of being on stage. Someone who is on stage is the center of attention. Every action they take is observed and noticed. Everything that happens to them is seen by the audience, and evokes emotion. The Hebrews were put in the position of being gazingstocks because they were followers of the LORD Jesus Christ. Because of their faith in Him, they endured reproaches and afflictions. And, as if they were on stage, everyone knew what they endured. Their situation was known by everyone that watched. And, it was all because they were followers of Jesus Christ.

     At the same time, because they were illuminated, they “…became companions of them that were so used.” The readers of this letter were not the only ones that were paying this price. Everywhere the gospel was preached those who believed endured the ridicule and disdain of those around them. This is true to this very day. In times of trial it is helpful to know that we are not alone. But there is more.

This was exactly what Jesus said would happen. In John 15:18 Jesus told His followers, “If the world hate you, ye know that it hated me before it hated you.” And, in Matthew 5:11, 12, Jesus said, “Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.” There is reward for the things that are endured for the Lord by His people. The writer wanted his readers to realize that the things they endured would be for God’s glory, and to their eternal benefit.

But, the writer was warning his readers not to turn away from their standing before God through Jesus Christ. Their afflictions were because they were His, and they have the sure and certain hope of spending eternity with Him. Hebrews 10:34 continues, “… knowing in yourselves that ye have in heaven a better and an enduring substance.” God sees and knows what His people endure. Their reward will be great. Trust God!

Blessèd are they that for His sake

Are persecuted and reviled;

Our Savior’s love a Heav’n can make,

When storms of earth are fierce and wild.

O, thoughts of Him who bore the cross,

Should teach our hearts to bear with joy

Their burdens, tho’ in pain and loss,

Whatever ills of earth annoy!

Whatever ills of earth annoy!

Blessèd are they!
Blessèd are they!

 

Blessèd are they that for His sake

Are persecuted and reviled;

May nothing here our courage shake,

While on we bear His yoke so mild.

O, still be faithful to the last,

Untempted e’en amid despair!

Tho’, round the faithful, snares are cast,

Theirs is Heav’n’s kingdom, bright and fair.

Theirs is Heav’n’s kingdom, bright and fair.

Blessèd are they!
Blessèd are they! (George Cooper)